1. Realize that Imposter Syndrome is more common than you think.
Source: https://vagile.net/tuckman-edison-model/
Source: https://hbr.org/2014/12/innovation-leadership-lessons-from-the-marshmallow-challenge
Source: https://corporate-edge.com.au/ce-author/what-drives-our-behaviour-at-work/
  1. Create a safe space where saying “I don’t know” or “I need help” is normalized.
  2. Encourage juniors to take credit for their work.
  3. Share your own impostor stories; vulnerability creates trust.
  4. Replace “Do you have any questions?” (the default answer is “No.”) with “What questions do you have?”.
  5. Praise effort, not intelligence. The latter bears the risk of putting your employee in an impostor cycle.

ila

--

--

Get the Medium app

A button that says 'Download on the App Store', and if clicked it will lead you to the iOS App store
A button that says 'Get it on, Google Play', and if clicked it will lead you to the Google Play store